Untitled (Covergirl)

Jean LaMarr

About the Print
Jean LaMarr, of the Paiute and Pit River Tribes, uses her art to dramatize the difference between Native American and non-Native American cultures. Her print Untitled (Covergirl) depicts a Native American woman in a coquettish pose, dressed in a traditional rawhide skirt and leggings and non-traditional lace bodice. LaMarr writes that her intention is to create a visual experience for the viewer to communicate between the Indian and non-Indian worlds. She was inspired by California’s Chicano mural and printmaking movement and embraced printmaking as a vehicle for political art. Her 1989 Cover Girl series utilized printmaking to reclaim images of American Indian women.

Jean LaMarr

American
Born April 28, 1945 in Susanville, CA
About the Artist

Native American artist and activist Jean LaMarr was born in Susanville, California. She is a member of the Paiute and Pit River Tribes and is most known for her murals, prints, dioramas, sculptures, and interactive installations and has been featured in various museums and towns. LaMarr studied at San Jose City, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Kala Institute.

She was inspired by California’s Chicano mural and printmaking movement and embraced printmaking as a vehicle for political art. In 1986, LaMarr founded the Native American Graphic Workshop. Her 1989 Cover Girl series utilized printmaking to reclaim images of American Indian women.

She taught at the College of Marin, San Francisco State University, the California College of Arts and Crafts, Lassen Community College, California Correctional Center, and the Institute of American Indian Art. She lives and works in Susanville, California. A retrospective of her art opened at the Nevada Art Museum in 2019.

Curriculum Connections

Suggested Topics for Portraiture (in studio art and art history education), Visual Narratives, and Expressive Writing

Portraiture (in studio art and art history education), Visual Narratives, Expressive Writing:

The use of words or a combination of words, symbols, and human images to convey deeply felt emotions.

Questions to Consider

Creative people — artists, musicians, dancers, and writers — often create new works bearing witness to the death of a loved one, especially when it is a tragic death or the result of a catastrophic event like an environmental or health disaster such as COVID-19.