Teaching Resources

Download the Artura
Teacher Guide

Blues for the Middle Passage II

Offset lithograph and collage of a modern depiction of the infamous Middle Passage: the ocean-crossing route traveled by ships containing captured and enslaved Africans taken from West Africa to the Americas.

VIEW RESOURCE

Negroes to be Sold

The print looks back on the long history of Black enslavement and treatment as property and market- place commodity. It, in addition, looks forward to a present and future in which sports and entertainment may continue that sense of Black bodies and minds being “owned.”

VIEW RESOURCE

Holocaust Preface

A suite of ten lithographs illustrating the horrific mass murder of Jews in Europe before and during World War II — the devastation and global injustice caused by the Holocaust.

VIEW RESOURCE

Heaven and Earth

This representation of a woman and small child by a river walking among trees and flowers evokes many narratives about our connections to each other and the environment of a Black Jewish congregation stand in front of a store-front house of worship.

VIEW RESOURCE

Generations

Paul Keene’s print suggests connecting various extended family members with community-wide struggles and the promise of the future. “The phrase ‘Final Notice’ is not to signify an end of past hardship, but to proclaim and offer a challenge for a new beginning that will break old cycles.”

VIEW RESOURCE

200 Yrs

This print celebrates the election of Barack Obama as the first Black and 44th president of the United States. It also pays homage to all the exceptional and courageous people who preceded Obama and made his election possible two hundred years after the Slave Act of 1808.

VIEW RESOURCE

Quest: We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest

The connection between this couple, the idea of choosing who to love, the institution of marriage, and a family construct was rarely afforded slaves as their own choice. This print explores the connection/disconnection between the institutions of slavery, marriage, and family at different times among Blacks in United
States history.

VIEW RESOURCE

My Country Needs Me…

Rodney Ewing’s print shows the face of a Black youth with the words “My country needs me, and if I were not here I would have to be invented” from Hortense J. Spillers’ “Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe.”

VIEW RESOURCE

Storm’s Coming

This abstracted image of a Black youth is from the artist’s Urban Warriors series. This young man shows confidence and determination as he confronts the many challenges coming his way, including the anger that society has placed on him due to racism and social injustice.

VIEW RESOURCE

St. George

In this print a Black soldier in a Civil War uniform holds a cross. Other crosses appear on his hands and decorate his uniform. While this soldier may not have the look of a traditional saint, he does have the stature of a noble soldier.

VIEW RESOURCE

Promised Land

Urban Street Scene — Diversity-rich Brooklyn, NY is home to many religious groups. In this scene, members of a Black Jewish congregation stand in front of a store front house of worship.

VIEW RESOURCE

Rhythms Across Generations

By recalling stories of musicians, writers and artists who were also socially active and represented his parent’s generation, Louis Delsarte explores how culture and resistance evolved in Harlem during the 1940s and 1950s.

VIEW RESOURCE

Face-Off

“It is the process of formation of what was/is behind my face that my work explores. Through the manipu lation of imagery and color, I hope to reveal some of what goes on behind the changing face of America.“In the print Face-Off, I have taken my face and made it into a mask of Color…the tones are simply layers of ink on a piece of paper, just as skin is a layer of tissue on other tissue.”

VIEW RESOURCE

Untitled (Danny Alvarez)

The central figure in this color woodcut is inspired by the Aztec goddess Tonantzin, a general title bestowed on female deities who were worshiped by Indigenous peoples living in what is now Mexico and elsewhere in Central America.

VIEW RESOURCE

Portrait of a Young Woman

“Portrait of a Young Woman is one of a series of portraits I have created which were based on archival photographs of Asian women. Although little is known about the real woman in the print, her face inspired a fictional narrative about the subject’s history (Japanese American internment camps during WWII). Portraiture, as a form of biography, is part of a body of work which attempts to reveal the presence of an inner life in subjects that have often been dehumanized and culturally stereotyped. Portraiture in this context serves as a way to present positive images of Asians in America, who are seen in relation to work, family and the community.”

VIEW RESOURCE

Hagar’s Dress

Hagar’s dress is among a suite of works by Taylor Pickett that reference the Middle Passage – the transport of African captives across the Atlantic as cargo for profit – as the foreground passages and crossings in life. often uses garments, notably dresses, as metaphors or carriers of identity and life story.

VIEW RESOURCE

Blues Band

In this print Paul Keene pays homage to Blues music, its spirituality, and Black people who, while enduring racial oppression, found ways to enjoy social interactions and music that spoke to them in the southern Mississippi Delta during the early 1900s generation, Louis Delsarte explores how culture and resistance evolved in Harlem during the 1940s and 1950s.

VIEW RESOURCE

Buil II

Buil II is the detailed drawing of an early version of the modern skyscraper. In this print, Hideki Kumura uses the form and shape of the building to investigate live, value and color in printmaking.

VIEW RESOURCE

Hinode

This computer-assisted maze-like drawing turns three dimensional drawing into interweaving shapes where lines move in multiple directions in a tight, layered environment in which the foreground form is only distinguishable by the weight of the solid yellow lines.

VIEW RESOURCE

Cut

This color abstraction by Odili Odita, who is a professor at Tyler School of Art and Architecture in Philadelphia, employs geometric shapes in colorful contrasting values.

VIEW RESOURCE

Down on War

The artist’s grandfather Allan Freelon used art as therapy to recover from injury and traumatic stress during service in Europe during WWI. He later became the first Black art supervisor for the school district in his hometown of Philadelphia.

VIEW RESOURCE

Unity

Louis Delsarte’s depiction of a family shows a father, mother, and children posing for a formal photograph with the mother as the center of family life.

VIEW RESOURCE

Untitled (Covergirl)

Jean LaMarr, of the Paiute and Pit River Tribes, uses her art to dramatize the difference between Native American and non-Native American cultures. Her print Untitled (Covergirl) depicts a Native American woman in a coquettish pose, dressed in a traditional rawhide skirt and leggings and non-traditional lace bodice.

VIEW RESOURCE

Cleo

“Art for me is an instrument of communication — with myself and with others. It forces me to continually examine my own thoughts and actions, as well as those of others. The experiences in life can be viewed in a flexible and inclusive manner without limitations. Art is not some theory that you learn but a way of life that you choose to develop. Once nurtured it thrives on your memory bank and your need to reach out and seek to understand the tangible and the intangible. Thus, for me, art and life are inseparable.” – SL

VIEW RESOURCE

Yemenja

This print by Eugene Grigsby is an exploration of motherhood, a mother’s role as protector, and love of humankind, and is an expression of maternal beauty and strength.

VIEW RESOURCE

99% Project NO. 53

Huckaby’s The 99% Project apart of an installation of 101 Lithographic Portraits Produced at Brandywine Workshop and Archives. He began this series by drawing family members and individuals he encountered near his neighborhood, Huckaby focuses less on locale than on the process of engaging with people who might otherwise be marginalized in society.

VIEW RESOURCE

Lullaby

Gwen Knight Lawrence presents a timeless subject — mother and child — in the context of the realities of Black life.

VIEW RESOURCE

Weapon 3

Rectangle, square, and triangle are the main design elements in this print. The leaning arrow serves as a line to complete the 90-degree angle that allows the vertical rectangle to stand straight

VIEW RESOURCE

Untitled (Ted Agoos AIA)

Reflections and mirrored images are often used to create visual excitement, extend senses of depth and length, and create other enhancing effects in the design of buildings and their interiors.

VIEW RESOURCE

Untitled (Nannette Acker Clark)

In this collage and constructed print, lines set at angles create shapes and forms that, in turn, repeat to create patterns. Colors accentuate the differences in the forms and their harmony and unity.

VIEW RESOURCE

Standing

A playful composition of geometric shapes accented by color fill-ins in which white is used as another shape defining color or a negative space in the composition.

VIEW RESOURCE

Family Ark

Heavily influenced by his travel to Ghana and other West African countries early on, the artist depicts family, ancestry, and the central role of the mother. Ideas, beliefs and the symbols of these African cultures, traditions and myths are embodied in the animals, furniture, utensils and shapes represented in the composition.

VIEW RESOURCE

Holocaust #8

Offset lithograph of “exterminated” (that is, murdered as part of a genocide) Jews lying on the ground before being burned in an incinerator.

VIEW RESOURCE

Five Canoes

A dreamlike image of a young Indigenous Aboriginal woman under five canoes. The print with poem on the right edge (a collaboration with the artist’s poet-wife, Carol A.Beane) memorializes the land and the various Indigenous Aboriginal peoples who have been relocated (removed) from it in Australia.

VIEW RESOURCE

Jonkonnu Festival

View All Resources Vincent D. Smith 1996 Color offset lithograph Image/sheet: 21 9/16 x 29¾ inches (54.8 x 75.6 cm) 2009-61-80 VIEW OBJECT RECORD About

VIEW RESOURCE

Watching

View All Resources Elizabeth Grajales 1989 Color offset lithograph Image/sheet: 21 5/8 x 30 inches (54.9 x 76.2 cm) 2009-61-33 VIEW OBJECT RECORD About the

VIEW RESOURCE

Bronx Project

View All Resources Toshio Sasaki 1991 Color offset lithograph Image/sheet: 21 ¾ x 30 inches (55.3 x 76.2 cm) 2009-61-75 VIEW OBJECT RECORD About the

VIEW RESOURCE

Family Ark

View All Resources John Biggers 1992 Color offset lithograph triptych Image/sheets (three joined): 29¾ x 49½ inches (74.6 x 125.7 cm) Center panel (image/sheet): 29¾

VIEW RESOURCE

El Túnel

View All Resources Ibrahim Miranda 1999 Screenprint printed in light tan and black inks Image: 1¼ x 24 inches (46 x 61 cm);Sheet: 21¾ x

VIEW RESOURCE

Isaiah

View All Resources Izaiah Zagar 1986 Color offset lithograph Image/sheet: 30 x 22 inches (76 x 55.2 cm) 2009-61-90 VIEW OBJECT RECORD About the Print

VIEW RESOURCE